Usefulness of the ideation principle of extended effort in real world professional and managerial problem solving

Basadur, M.S. & Thompson, R. (1986). Usefulness of the ideation principle of extended effort in real world professional and managerial problem solving. Journal of Creative Behavior, Vol. 20 (1), pp 23-34.

Abstract

In this study, the usefulness of the ideation principle of extended effort is field-tested on meaningful managerial and technical problems. Most previous testing has been in the laboratory on non-real world problems. Specifically tested and supported is the hypothesis that the best (most preferred) Idea Is more likely to occur after rather than during, the chronological earliest ideas (first third) so generated. Also tested, but not supported, is a more stringent hypothesis, that the best (most preferred) idea is more likely to occur among the chronologically latest (last third) so generated. Also in this study, a system of five hypotheses is put together from the literature including the two hypotheses above. The purpose is to explain several different Interpretations of benefits theoretically expected from the extended effort technique. The empirical support for each of the hypotheses is reviewed. The two tested in this research are those which have not previously been empirically tested either in the laboratory or the field. This work is important In view of the rapidly growing Interest In training to increase organizational creativity (Grossman, 1982: Abend, 1979). The literature on such training is fragmentary and incomplete (Basadur, Graen & Green, 1982).

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